Economic Perspectives with Hopeton Hay on KAZI 88.7 FM in Austin, TX

Changing Texas Demographics and Accidental Management Focus of April 4th Economic Perspectives

Posted by nchanel on March 30, 2011

Hopeton Hay interviews Evan Smith, CEO and Editor- in-Chief of Texas Tribune and Jessica Looney of PeopleFund on their upcoming forum on the changing demographics in Texas. Listen live at KAZI 88.7 FM Austin or online here: KAZIFM.org. He will also interview Hank Gilman, Deputy Managing Editor of Fortune Magazine on his new book You Can’t Fire Everyone and his lessons on becoming a manager.

Following that, Hopeton will interview a representative of the City of Austin about the proposed Urban Rail Line that will serve central Austin.  You can get more info at http://www.austinurbanrail.com/resources/urban-rail-project

The face of Texas is changing. Under that wide brim cowboy hat maybe something unexpected. PeopleFund presents PeopleTalk, an upcoming event featuring Evan Smith, on demographics, policy, and civic engagement.  Learn about changing Texas demographics and the impact on policies, your part in the Texas political process, greater civic engagement, and making room for a civil, informed discourse for a better and more productive Texas. Join the forum on Thursday, April 7th, 11:30 AM – 1:00 PM at the Alamo Drafthouse, South Lamar. Tickets are available in advance or at the door; purchase includes salad and pizza from the Alamo Drafthouse. Buy tickets here!

About People Fund:

PeopleFund is a non-profit 501(c)(3) based in Austin, Texas. Founded in 1994 as Austin Community Development corporation, they provide loans, financial and technical assistance to people who are left out of the financial mainstream.  In 2008, they founded PeopleTrust, a non-profit 501(c)3 dedicated to creating and maintaining affordable housing in Texas. PeopleFund is a Community Development Financial Institution (CDFI) certified by the U.S. Department of Treasury

About Evan Smith:

Evan Smith is the CEO and editor-in-chief of The Texas Tribune, which, in its first year in operation, won two national Edward R. Murrow Awards from the Radio Television Digital News Association and a General Excellence Award from the Online News Association. Previously he spent nearly 18 years at Texas Monthly, stepping down in August 2009 as the magazine’s president and editor-in-chief. On his watch, Texas Monthly was nominated for 16 National Magazine Awards, the magazine industry’s equivalent of the Pulitzer Prize, and twice was awarded the National Magazine Award for General Excellence. He currently hosts a new show, Overheard with Evan Smith, that airs on PBS stations nationally. A New York native, Smith has a bachelor’s degree in public policy from Hamilton College in Clinton, N.Y., and a master’s degree in journalism from the Medill School at Northwestern University.

Also Featured,

Hopeton also interviews Hank Gilman about his fortunate lessons on developing into a manger and what they mean for you and your business.

His book, You Can’t Fire Everyone: and Other Lessons from an Accidental Manager, tells Gilman coming of age in management. Gilman is the opposite of a slick management guru. He’s an old-school journalist who was suddenly given responsibility for a bunch of other journalists. In other words, he was an accidental manager, just like millions of others who never trained for the challenges of being a boss. Drawing on his wealth of experience (i.e. countless screw-ups) and with wry humor, Gilman shares the finer points of what it takes to be a great boss. He covers everything from whether you should try to be friends with your staff (Don’t) to what will happen if you tell someone about to go on vacation to “think about how you can do things differently” (You will burn in hell!).

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