Economic Perspectives with Hopeton Hay on KAZI 88.7 FM in Austin, TX

Podcast: Learn About Healthcare.gov at Austin Event

Posted by Hopeton on March 10, 2014

The SBA Women’s Business Center at BiGAustin is sponsoring a Forum on Healthcare.gov for small business owners and consumers on Thursday, March 13, 11:30 a.m. – 1:30 p.m. at its office at 5407 North I-H 35, 2nd floor of Chase Bank Bldg in the Capital Plaza in Austin, TX.  Claudia Connor, Director of  the center,


came on Economic Perspectives today to discuss the forum along with Marian Williams, a Navigator for Healthcare.gov, and Genice Brown-Harris, an Austin area entrepreneur who has enrolled in Healthcare.gov.  To listen to the interview click here: 


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Regional Conference Helps African American Students Develop Careers in Accounting

Posted by Hopeton on September 12, 2013

Raphael Irving

Raphael Irving

Since its founding in 1969, the National Association of Black Accountants (NABA) has played a major role in helping African Americans in the accounting industry, both students, and professionals, build successful careers.  On Economic Perspectives this past Monday, the Western Region President , Raphael Irving, talked about how college students will benefit from participating in the NABA Southwest-Western Region Student Conference which will be held in Houston October 3 – 5.  To listen to the interview click here: 


This year’s conference, as in past years, will offer seminars and workshops designed to enhance your communicative and interpersonal skills and provide tools that will allow for a smoother transition into the professional environment. The conference will also offer the optimum forum to interact with students from other colleges and universities.

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PODCAST: How to Build a Successful Small Business

Posted by Hopeton on September 10, 2013

Brian Walters

Brian Walters

Management consultant Brian Walters recently discussed what is takes to be successful in business on Economic Perspectives. Walters, who teaches business courses at Austin Community College, has an MBA and over two decades of corporate and consulting experience.  To listen to the interview click here:


Posted in Austin, Interview, Podcast, Radio, small business | Tagged: | Leave a Comment »

Interview with Founders of Capital City Black Film Festival

Posted by Hopeton on August 13, 2013

Winston Williams

Winston Williams

Winston G. and Harrell D. Williams, brothers and co-founders of the Capital City Black Film Festival talked about their passion for filmmaking and their path to creating the festival on the

Harrell Williams

Harrell Williams

August 12 edition of Economic Perspectives.  The film festival, which debuts in Austin September 26 – 28, exists to provide burgeoning Black filmmakers from across the nation an opportunity to showcase their works in one of the top cities in the United States for independent filmmakers.

To listen to the interview click here:


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PODCAST: BiG Austin Energy and Transportation Economic Development Summitt October 10

Posted by Hopeton on July 29, 2013

Stacy Dukes-Rhone

Stacy Dukes-Rhone

On the July 29 edition of Economic Perspectives, BigAustin executive director Stacy Dukes-Rhone discussed the upcoming Energy and Transportation Economic Development Summitt BigAustin is hosting October 10.  To listen to the interview click here: 


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Posted in Business, Economic Development, Podcast | Tagged: , , | Leave a Comment »

PODCAST: Interview with Austin Free-Net About Digital Inclusion

Posted by Hopeton on July 29, 2013

Juanita Budd

Juanita Budd

Juanita Budd, executive director of Austin Free-Net, was interviewed on Economic Perspectives about digital inclusion in April.    To listen to the interview click here: 


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Podcast: City of Austin Economic Development Initiatives

Posted by Hopeton on July 23, 2013

Margaret Shaw

Margaret Shaw

Margaret Shaw recently discussed some of the initiatives of the City of Austin to foster job growth and redevelopment on Economic Perspectives.  To listen to the podcast of this interview click here: Margaret Shaw Interview.

As an Economic Redevelopment Program Manager for the City of Austin, Margaret Shaw helps attract businesses that enhance Austin’s livability and economic viability in a manner that preserves the community’s character and its environment.  She promotes commercial investment by industrial, manufacturing and export/import firms, primarily at/near the Austin airport.  Expanding these industries in Austin helps to meet the demands of an ever increasing population and provide job opportunities for residents without a four-year college degree.  She also helps to coordinate mixed-use redevelopment efforts in the central business district.

Posted in Economic Development, Employment, Podcast, small business | Tagged: , , | Leave a Comment »

Preserving Social Security and It’s Importance to African Americans

Posted by Hopeton on February 16, 2013

One of the most important aspects of economics in the African American community is Social Security.  According to the  research of the National Committee to Preserve Social Security and Medicare (NCPSSM), about 75 percent of the African American beneficiaries are dependent on Social Security for at least half of their income and 40 percent of them rely on it  for all of their income.  To learn more about the impact of Social Security on African Americans listen to the podcast of my Economic Perspectives interview with Max Richtman, President of NCPSSM: Max Richtman Interview.

Posted in Interview, Radio, Retirement Benefits | Tagged: , , | Leave a Comment »

President Obama’s Addresses Jobs and Growth at November 9 Press Conference

Posted by Hopeton on November 16, 2012

Enclosed are the remarks of President Barack Obama from a press conference on November 9.

Well, good afternoon, everybody.  Now that those of us on the campaign trail have had a chance to get a little sleep, it’s time to get back to work.  And there is plenty of work to do.

As I said on Tuesday night, the American people voted for action, not politics as usual.  You elected us to focus on your jobs, not ours.  And in that spirit, I’ve invited leaders of both parties to the White House next week, so we can start to build consensus around the challenges that we can only solve together. And I also intend to bring in business and labor and civic leaders from all across the country here to Washington to get their ideas and input as well.

At a time when our economy is still recovering from the Great Recession, our top priority has to be jobs and growth.  That’s the focus of the plan I talked about during the campaign.  It’s a plan to reward small businesses and manufacturers that create jobs here, not overseas.  It’s a plan to give people the chance to get the education and training that businesses are looking for right now.  It’s a plan to make sure this country is a global leader in research and technology and clean energy, which will attract new companies and high-wage jobs to America.  It’s a plan to put folks back to work, including our veterans, rebuilding our roads and our bridges, and other infrastructure.  And it’s a plan to reduce our deficit in a balanced and responsible way.

Our work is made that much more urgent because at the end of this year, we face a series of deadlines that require us to make major decisions about how to pay our deficit down — decisions that will have a huge impact on the economy and the middle class, both now and in the future.  Last year, I worked with Democrats and Republicans to cut a trillion dollars’ worth of spending that we just couldn’t afford.  I intend to work with both parties to do more — and that includes making reforms that will bring down the cost of health care so we can strengthen programs like Medicaid and Medicare for the long haul.

But as I’ve said before, we can’t just cut our way to prosperity.  If we’re serious about reducing the deficit, we have to combine spending cuts with revenue — and that means asking the wealthiest Americans to pay a little more in taxes.  That’s how we did it in the 1990s, when Bill Clinton was President.  That’s how we can reduce the deficit while still making the investments we need to build a strong middle class and a strong economy.  That’s the only way we can still afford to train our workers, or help our kids pay for college, or make sure that good jobs in clean energy or high-tech manufacturing don’t end up in countries like China.

Now, already, I’ve put forward a detailed plan that allows us to make these investments while reducing our deficit by $4 trillion over the next decade.  I want to be clear — I’m not wedded to every detail of my plan.  I’m open to compromise. I’m open to new ideas.  I’m committed to solving our fiscal challenges.  But I refuse to accept any approach that isn’t balanced.  I am not going to ask students and seniors and middle-class families to pay down the entire deficit while people like me, making over $250,000, aren’t asked to pay a dime more in taxes.  I’m not going to do that.

And I just want to point out this was a central question during the election.  It was debated over and over again.  And on Tuesday night, we found out that the majority of Americans agree with my approach — and that includes Democrats, independents, and a lot of Republicans across the country, as well as independent economists and budget experts. That’s how you reduce the deficit — with a balanced approach.

So our job now is to get a majority in Congress to reflect the will of the American people.  And I believe we can get that majority.  I was encouraged to hear Speaker Boehner agree that tax revenue has to be part of this equation — so I look forward to hearing his ideas when I see him next week.

And let me make one final point that every American needs to hear.  Right now, if Congress fails to come to an agreement on an overall deficit reduction package by the end of the year, everybody’s taxes will automatically go up on January 1st —  everybody’s — including the 98 percent of Americans who make less than $250,000 a year.  And that makes no sense.  It would be bad for the economy and would hit families that are already struggling to make ends meet.

Now, fortunately, we shouldn’t need long negotiations or drama to solve that part of the problem.  While there may be disagreement in Congress over whether or not to raise taxes on folks making over $250,000 a year, nobody — not Republicans, not Democrats — want taxes to go up for folks making under $250,000 a year.  So let’s not wait.  Even as we’re negotiating a broader deficit reduction package, let’s extend the middle-class tax cuts right now.  Let’s do that right now.

That one step — that one step — would give millions of families — 98 percent of Americans and 97 percent of small businesses — the certainty that they need going into the new year.  It would immediately take a huge chunk of the economic uncertainty off the table, and that will lead to new jobs and faster growth.  Business will know that consumers, they’re not going to see a big tax increase.  They’ll know that most small businesses won’t see a tax increase.  And so a lot of the uncertainty that you’re reading about, that will be removed.

In fact, the Senate has already passed a bill doing exactly this, so all we need is action from the House.  And I’ve got the pen ready to sign the bill right away.  I’m ready to do it.  I’m ready to do it.

The American people understand that we’re going to have differences and disagreements in the months to come.  They get that.  But on Tuesday, they said loud and clear that they won’t tolerate dysfunction.  They won’t tolerate politicians who view compromise as a dirty word.  Not when so many Americans are still out of work.  Not when so many families and small business owners are still struggling to pay the bills.

What the American people are looking for is cooperation.  They’re looking for consensus.  They’re looking for common sense. Most of all, they want action.  I intend to deliver for them in my second term, and I expect to find willing partners in both parties to make that happen.  So let’s get to work.

Thank you very much, everybody.  Thank you.

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Challenges of Texas Hispanic Businesses Focus of September 10 Economic Perspectives

Posted by Hopeton on September 9, 2012

Dr. Elsie Echeverri-Carroll and Dr. Bruce Kellison will discuss The Survey of Texas Hispanic-Owned Businesses with Paid Employees on the September 10 Economic Perspectives at 5:30 p.m. CT.  Echeverri-Carroll and Kellison are researchers at The University of Texas at Austin Bureau of Business Research. Enclosed below is the press release announcing the survey results.

The two most critical challenges for Hispanic-owned businesses to grow are overcoming a lack of training in management and communication skills and gaining better access to markets, according to new research of Hispanic-owned businesses in Texas from The University of Texas at Austin. The study provides a fresh look at the challenges these mostly small businesses face.

The “Survey of Texas Hispanic-owned Businesses with Paid Employees”was producedby the university’s Bureau of Business Research (BBR) for the Texas Association of Mexican American Chambers of Commerce (TAMACC). The report findings are being presented today at the TAMACC annual meeting in San Antonio by the Bureau’s Bruce Kellison and Elsie Echeverri-Carroll, the principal investigators.

The university invested $155,000 in the survey through the Herb Kelleher Center at the McCombs School of Business and the Office of the President of The University of Texas at Austin. The Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation also funded the survey.

“We were pleased to help the Texas Association of Mexican American Chambers of Commerce in studying this important economic issue,” said university President Bill Powers. “A better understanding of the challenges faced by Texas’ Hispanic businesses will allow TAMACC to identify strategies to help these businesses grow and help create jobs and new opportunity in Texas.”

“We’re paying attention to this demographic because Hispanic-owned businesses create jobs for Texans, and their ability to scale is critical to the Texas economy,” said McCombs Dean Tom Gilligan.

The survey is based on the results of a mail survey of 2,811 Texas-based Hispanic businesses with paid employees conducted between July 2011 and August 2012. Findings include:

Most Hispanic-owned businesses in Texas start small and stay small even after many years of operation.

  • Forty-seven percent of Hispanic businesses with paid employees have between 1 and 4 employees, and 73 percent have fewer than 25 employees.
  • Eighty percent of young firms (5 years or younger) have fewer than 10 employees, while 66 percent of mature firms (16 years or older) still have fewer than 10 employees.

Hispanic business owners have high educational attainment.

  • Hispanic owners of businesses with paid employees have higher educational achievements than the general Hispanic population: 77 percent of the employers have some kind of post-high-school education, compared with 34 percent of Texas Hispanics in general over the age of 25.
  • Hispanic entrepreneurs also have many years of business experience; 56 percent of respondents have more than 20 years of business experience in their current business.
  • Many of the Hispanic business owners indicated that their employees need training, particularly in team management and leadership (24 percent), business/customer relations (16 percent) and written and oral communication (14 percent).

Promoting Hispanic business ownership can increase Hispanic employment.

  • More than 80 percent of the respondents indicated that they hire mainly Hispanics or an equal number of Hispanics and non-Hispanics. These findings are in line with previous census results that show business owners tend to hire more employees in their own ethnic groups.

Hispanic business owners feel they have less access to private and public market opportunities.

  • A larger percentage of respondents agree that they do not have equal access to government and private sector customers than disagree with such statements. Moreover, while 34 percent of respondents agree that they do not have equal opportunities in the private sector, a much larger proportion — 49 percent — agree that they do not have equal opportunities in the public sector.

“The information provided has yielded valuable insights, and we hope that this report will be useful to the survey participants as well as to other business owners who plan to start or expand their businesses,” said Echeverri-Carroll, one of the study’s principal investigators. “The Bureau of Business Research at The University of Texas at Austin is pleased to have produced this study in order to help Hispanic business owners succeed and continue to contribute vital strength to the Texas economy.”

Posted in Hispanics, Interview, minority business, Radio | Tagged: , , | Leave a Comment »

 
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